Basic Rules for Video Composition

videography

As promised I will present, over the next few weeks, a series of articles on effective video techniques specifically geared toward the production of educational media.  These can be “talking head” videos for delivering information or “hands on” videos for demonstrating skills and techniques.  Either way,  the following tips can be used to make your material more polished and professional.

In our first excursion into video training we will look at shot composition.  Setting up and framing the shot means more than just pointing the camera at whatever you want to show your students.  Using good shooting technique can make the difference between something interesting and engaging and something boring that no one wants to see.  Remember, if the students don’t watch the video, they are not learning.

Rule #1:  The Rule of Thirds:  Many people, when faced with the prospect of filming something or someone, simply point the camera at whatever it is they are filming, whether it be person, place, or thing, and try to center the object in the view finder.  This is, to use a professional videography term…BORING!  Watch your favorite movie and see how many times the field of view has the actor centered exactly in the middle of the screen for an extended take.  Instead, professional videographers or camera operators will apply what is commonly called the Rule of Thirds.  Imagine the viewfinder of your camera is divided up like a tic-tac-toe board.  Many video cameras come with a setting in the menu that will overlay this type of thing on your viewfinder to help you in framing but if yours does not…practice imagination.  It might look like the picture below…

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The yellow lines, of course, will not appear on the video but they do help you in framing your shot.  Notice the face of the actor.  The camera operator has placed the intersection of two of the lines on her face rather than centering her in the middle square.  This makes for a pleasing and interesting shot.  The camera operator has also ensured that the woman’s eye-line is in the upper third of the shot rather than the middle.  This, coupled with the distance used in filming makes sure that the woman fills the screen without being cut at the waist.  Avoid cutting off people at, or immediately below the waist.  The bottom of the shot should rest just a bit above the hip bones.  Also, for a medium shot such as this, it is important to leave a bit of space above the top of the head.  Finally, if the woman were facing the opposite way (to her right) then the appropriate place to center her face would be the intersection of lines on the opposite side of the screen.  We don’t want our subject too close to the edge of the screen.  Leave some nose room.

These are just a few of the things one can do to make their video content more interesting.  It might seem unnecessary and, in fact, most people could not tell what was wrong with a badly composed shot.  However, almost anyone can recognize a badly framed scene, even if they don’t know why.  It looks awkward when these rules are violated.

I hope this tidbit of technique was useful to you.  Please feel free to comment and follow.  Also, if you are interested in learning more about the art and science of videography or Educational Video Production, head over the the Adobe Education Exchange.  You can register for a free account and have access to tons of professional development material to make your educational content the best it can be.

Lights…Camera…Learn!promo

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