WeTeach_CS – Everyone Needs to be Digitally Literate

weteachcs-stacked-orange-largeAnother conference has come and gone.  I attend  a great many of these over the course of a year and one thing I have noticed is that most of them are too big.  TCEA is a wonderful place to share and learn but it is very easy to get lost. Bringing thousands of people together to share ideas, oddly enough, makes sharing those ideas much more difficult.  This is not the case with the WeTeach_CS Computer Science Summit, held each year in Austin at the J. J. Pickle Research Campus.  (That name appeals to me for some reason).

WeTeach_CS is a program sponsored through the Center for STEM Education by  the University of Texas in Austin with the express purpose of promoting Computer Science Education in Texas High Schools.  They are deeply involved in promoting Professional Development for Texas Computer Science Teachers and probably are best known for providing $1000 stipends for teachers who are willing to become certified in Computer Science and to teach it in the State of Texas.  WeTeach_CS provides training and resources in all aspects of Computer Science with a focus on helping teachers successfully pass the TEA 141 exam to become a certified Computer Science Teacher in Texas.  They provide support and resources for currently employed CS teachers to insure that students in Texas High Schools have the best access to Computer Technology and Education available.  They also act as advocates for Computer Science Teachers and educators in general.

To those ends, the staff of WeTeach_CS, led by Dr. Victor Sampson, Director of the Center for STEM Education, and Dr. Carol Fletcher, the Deputy Director of the Center for STEM Education, sponsor a summit meeting of interested Computer Science Teachers, Administrators, Technology Support Staff, and Vendors from across the State and around the Nation.  This event, ably organized behind the scenes by Amy Werst, Manager of Programmatic Operations for the Center, is a great opportunity for educators to share techniques and ideas with their peers from across the state as well as a place be become informed on the condition of Computer Science Education in Texas.

I have been privileged to attend this summit for the last two years (2015/16 and 2016/17) and I can say that, unlike many conference type events, this one is worth the time and effort to attend.  In the past I have attended trainings where the primary function seemed to be getting as many potential customers in front of as many vendors as possible.  Many of the “educator sessions” turned into sales pitches for whatever product the vendor was selling.  While I recognize the need for sponsors and that sponsors should receive benefits for the investment they make, it is very easy to take this to a level so extreme that it ceases to have any educational value at all.  (Advice to all event organizers of this type: Limit vendor/sponsors to the absolute minimum necessary to fund the event and make sure that the content they are providing in their sessions is actually useful to people who aren’t going to buy their products.)

I believe WeTeach_CS Summit organizers hit the balance perfectly.  Aside from main corporate sponsors (IBM and Oracle this year – Thank You Both Very Much!), there were only about 6 vendor sponsors in attendance.  This for a conference of a couple of hundred attendees.  The tables were located in the common break area and the vendors were not intrusive at all.  The sessions they presented were informative and useful, even to people with no intention of purchasing anything.  In short, they were an asset to the meeting and not a distraction.  It would have been very easy to fill the common area up with vendor tables and the organizers could possibly have made more money but I believe that the conference would have suffered.  Hats of the Amy, Carol, and everyone involved for doing a great job organizing.

The facilities provided by UT were, as usual for the university, top notch.  I am anUT Associate Faculty with the OnRamps program as well as a budding Bootstrap presenter and so I frequently attend meetings and presentations at various locations within the University of Texas.  I have never had a bad experience with any UT sponsored event.  The WeTeach_CS Summit for 2016/17 was an excellent reflection upon the University of Texas and the value it places on education in the State of Texas.  (I’m saying this even though I graduated out of the A&M system so you know it has to be true).

If Carol, Amy, and the other attendees of this conference are any indication, the future of Computer Science, and education in general, in Texas, is bright. Given the projected growth of the Computer Industry and all things digital, I would say that the future of the economy and the welfare of the people of Texas is also bright.  At least it will be if Carol Fletcher has anything to say about it.

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Ready to Reload

learningAnother year has come to a close.  It is time to begin preparations for the next year.  This is a most important time for any teacher, but especially for technology instructors because the material changes so rapidly and we owe it to our students to do our best to update materials.  It might be OK to teach English or Geometry with a 2 or 3 year old book but digital technology can   be obsolete in months or even weeks.

For me this will be a particularly  busy summer because I am also preparing to present Java game development at the WeTeach_CS in June in Austin.  If you are a Computer Science teacher you should definitely make plans to attend.  If you are thinking about becoming a Computer Science teacher you will be able to sign up for a $1000 stipend for passing the CS exam.  You REALLY need to consider attending.  I will also be attending a training session at the Colorado School of Mines in July to become a Bootstrap evangelist.  If you have not heard of Bootstrap, drop me a line.  It is a great way to teach Computer Programming and Algebra at the same time.  Finally I will be presenting at the OnRamps Summer Conference in Austin towards the end of July.  I am taking the family to Colorado for that presentation and we will spend a week there afterwards for a vacation.  Yes, teachers get to goof off all summer…right.

Meanwhile I am committed to revamp and polish my courses for the summer.  I am also committed to adding Captivate content to my coursework.  I have completed the first lesson in basic programming and integrated the SCORM package into Canvas.  Now it is just a matter of grinding them out until they are done.  I think I will track my progress in Captivate as I add content.  If you are interested in using Adobe Captivate then stay tuned.  I will add “how-to” content as I update.  I am also trying to introduce Muvizu animations as an instructional tool.  Wish me luck on that one.

I am also going to focus on developing video content from my class.  I have an acceptable camera and tripod.  Now I just need to figure out how to video classes without using a camera operator.  I am also doing a considerable amount of audio recording using Captivate and Camtasia to build online lessons.  My goal is to make my class completely available over the Internet for students who are absent on any given day.

If that was not enough to do for the summer, I am also learning to speak and read and write conversational Japanese.  Thus far I have almost completed Hiragana and I have begun Katakana and even started the Kanji.  If you are already a non-native Japanese speaker I would really like to hear how you managed it.  Needless to say the summer is a busy time for teachers.

Well I think that is quite enough for one summer so I am going to get busy.

夏を楽しむ

(Enjoy the summer)

TCEA 2017 is a GO!!

I just got my acceptance letter to present a premiere session at TCEA 2017 in Austin, TX tbusyhis year.  I will be presenting Arduino and the Internet of Things on Monday, Feb. 6 at 8:00 am.  You will need a premiere admission to attend as this is a half-day “hands-on” session.  I would LOVE to see someone there who is also a blog reader.  Speaking of which, I know I have been remiss in posting but this year has been incredibly busy.  I have nine (NINE!!) preps this year.  Seven classes, two of which run two classes concurrently.  Needless to say I am very overloaded.  Also, my fledgling music career is moving forward.  Fifth Sparrow completed their summer tour of West Texas and also played the Whitesboro Peanut Festival.  So before you chide me for inattentiveness, please be aware that I am not just being lazy.

Saddle Up for 2016-17

computercowboyIt’s time to saddle up and get ready for the 2016 – 17 school year.  Classes begin in Whitesboro on August 22 and so the teachers are diligently working through Professional Development exercises and preparing exams and lesson plans for the arrival of our new group.

It is also time to dust off the blog site and get ready for another year of promoting technology and all things computer.  I have already been accepted to present at the #TCEA2017 conference in Austin in February and I will also be going there two more times as part of my UT On-Ramps program.  As of today I am one class away from graduating from West Texas A&M University with my Masters Degree in Instructional Technology.  I will (fingers crossed) begin a Doctoral program with Sam Houston State University in the Spring of 2017.  Wish me luck 🙂  Meanwhile I have a full plate of classes to teach this year.  We offer Robotics and Automation, Concepts of Engineering, Principles of Information Technology, Computer Maintenance, Computer Science, as well as Basic and Advanced Programming.  Why couldn’t they have all this stuff available when I was in High School??

Top 10 Tech Skills Every Teacher Needs – Day 2

Tech560Welcome back to day 2 of the top tech skills that every teacher needs to provide a relevant and engaging learning environment in the digital world.  Last time we listed “Search Engine Skills”, “Office Mastery”, and “Social Media”.  Tonight we present three more skills that most teachers will find indispensable.  Remember, these are in NO particular order..

4.  Teachers should be bloggers.  Blogging is a skill that every teacher should posses.  News from your classroom, important current events, and information like assignment instructions can be presented easily to a large audience via a blog site.  Blogging is also a great way to communicate with peers and keep parents informed.  At the very least, blogging is an exercise in discipline.  In order to develop a following, fresh content must be added daily (or at least more than once a week).  Reading blogs allows a teacher to keep abreast of what others are doing.  It is a great way to find useful items for use in your own class.

5.  Creating video content is a vital skill.  Teachers should be familiar with the production and distribution of digital video.  Once upon a time, video creation was reserved to professionals.  Given the abundance of video editing tools, inexpensive cameras, and the ease with which material can be posted to YouTube, Facebook, and other social media sites, there is no reason for any teacher to fall behind the video curve.  Case in point,  your humble author built a highlights video for a chemistry class that I taught in 2010 over combustion chemistry.  The effects were done in Adobe After Effects and the final edit was in Premiere Pro.


It’s not about talent, it is about providing information and generating interest in your students.

6.  Teachers should be able to build a web presence.  Using Notepad to code up and ASP or PHP site and posting it via an FTP server is not really necessary (it IS good to know how) but all teachers should have some type of an online presence.  There are many hosting solutions available today with templates already in place that allow a potential webmaster to fill in information and present a fairly professional looking site to the Internet at large.  Your schedule, contact information, a fairly recent picture, and a minimum of biographical information should be available to parents, administrators, students, and, probably most importantly, potential employers.  A web site today is more like a virtual business card/biography.  It should be indexed and easily searchable.  If you keep current and accurate information available on the web, you won’t have to worry about what others post.

Well, that is surely enough for tonight.  I will try to finish up tomorrow.  Meanwhile, have a great evening.